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Posts for: May, 2015

Technology developed by Swedish firm Volumental can now reportedly scan the feet and recognize what size shoe would best fit the feet. Using 3D cameras such as Microsoft’s Kinect or Intel’s RealSense, the technology would map a person’s foot in seconds. The cameras would be connected to a computer and rotate around the foot to create a 3D image that depicts a specific shape and size. If successful, Volumental would be eliminating the need for customers to try on multiple sizes of shoes before finding their best fit; the technology would determine it for them.

Getting the right shoe size is important for overall foot health. If you have any concerns about shoe size, please contact Dr. Mayer Salama, D.P.M. of Salama Foot Care. Dr. Salama will answer any of your foot and ankle questions.

Getting the right shoe size

Sometimes it may be difficult finding the right shoe size because shoe sizes tend to vary depending on the brand and company you are considering. A size 6 for one brand may be a size 7 in another. Although many people know their exact shoe size, shoe size can vary within two sizes depending on where they shop.

When shoe shopping, it is best to try on the shoe and walk around for a bit to see how it fits and how it feels. Comfort is essential and the shoe must fit well, as ill-fitting shoes can lead to blisters, bruises at the back of the ankle and can also hurt the toes if the shoe is too tight.

Shopping online for shoes can be very tricky and time consuming, especially since you cannot try on the shoe or see how it fits or how it feels.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Farmington Hills, Dearborn, Clarkston, and Trenton, MI. We offer all the latest in diagnostic and treatment technologies to meet your needs.

Read more about getting the right shoe size


Author Christopher McDougall set off the barefoot running trend a few years ago when he released his book, Born To Run. The writer has long since stopped wearing thick cushioned running shoes that rose to popularity in the 1980s and 90s from brands such as Nike and Adidas. McDougall’s belief in barefoot running stems in its 2 million year-long history. “The purpose of running barefoot is not to run faster. The idea is trying to understand what your body does and get rid of all the variables. Back to first principles.”

If you have any concerns about barefoot running, contact Dr. Mayer Salama, D.P.M. of Salama Foot Care. Dr. Salama will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Barefoot Running

Barefoot running is a fairly popular trend in the running world. More than just simply ‘running without shoes,” barefoot running affects the way your feet hit the ground and your overall posture. Barefoot runners land on the front part of their feet as opposed to those who wear shoes, who usually strike their heel as they hit the ground.

Barefoot running contains many advantages, including:

  • A lower risk for ankle and foot injuries
  • Improvement in balance and body  posture
  • Strengthens muscles in the lower legs, ankles and feet that are not normally worked when wearing shoes

There are also some disadvantages to barefoot running, which include:

  • Lack of shoes increases the risk of incurring blisters, scrapes, bruises and cuts
  • Risk of Achilles tendonitis as a result of landing on the front of your feet constantly
  • Needing time and transition to adjust as the switch cannot be automatic

Start on even, flat surfaces and consider investing in minimalist running shoes. Minimalist running shoes provide the ‘feel’ of barefoot running while affording the same protection you get from wearing shoes. Barefoot running can be safe and enjoyable with the proper planning and transition.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Farmington Hills, Dearborn, Clarkston, and Trenton, MI. We offer all the latest in diagnostic and treatment technologies to meet your needs.

Read more about barefoot running.


While golf is not typically seen as a rigorous sport, repeatedly swinging a golf club can lead to hallux limitus—the jamming and deteriorating of the big toe joint.

Swinging can create an overextension of the big toe joint on the back foot, wearing out the cartilage or jamming the big toe joint.

Golfers who suffer from this condition generally have less mobility in this area than other parts of the foot. Pain in the big toe area should be viewed as a warning sign that intervention is necessary before the joint becomes arthritic.

Full recovery is much more difficult if one continues to play sports with a foot or ankle injury. If you would like assistance with an injury, see Dr. Mayer Salama, D.P.M. of Salama Foot Care. Dr. Salama will assess your injury and provide you with a quality treatment plan.  

Playing Sports with Foot Injuries

Many types of foot injuries affect athletes over the course of their athletic career. Despite their setbacks, many of these athletes will continue to play with mild foot injuries and attempt to ‘push’ through the pain. In order to be able to prevent injuries, it is important to stretch before any activity, wear proper footwear and replace shoes as needed. Some of the foot and ankle injuries athletes are at risk for include:

  • Turf toe- upward bending of the big toe outside normal range of motion
  • Stress Fractures
  • Overpronation- excessive foot movement during gait
  • Plantar Fasciitis- swollen ligament in the foot’s base
  • Strains

For more serious injuries it is recommended to consult with a podiatrist or orthopedic specialist as fractures and other serious conditions may require surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Farmington Hills, Dearborn, Clarkston, and Trenton, MI. We offer all the latest in diagnostic and treatment technologies to meet your needs.

Read more about Playing Sports with Foot Injuries


Burning feet, medically known as neuropathy or paresthesia, is characterized by painful tingling sensations in the feet. The condition—which is more common in the summer—mainly occurs due to damaged and weakened nerves in the legs, which are more prevalent as one ages.

The prickling sensation associated with burning feet can be treated at home with mixtures containing water and either ginger juice, hawthorne, or thyme. Any of these remedies will relieve pain and help promote blood circulation.

Aside from neuropathy and paresthesia, several nerve complications can ail the feet. For assistance with a nerve disorder in your lower extremities, visit Dr. Mayer Salama, D.P.M. of Salama Foot Care. Dr. Salama will can provide you with a specific diagnosis and work with you to alleviate your symptoms.

Nerve Disorders of the Foot and Ankle

There are two nerve disorders of the foot and ankle called Interdigital Neuroma and Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome. These conditions affect the hands as well, and are caused by stress and genetics. People who suffer from Interdigital Neuroma and Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome are prone to serious pain and inflammation in the area.

Pain that is associated with Interdigital Neuroma is often from local inflammation in the nerves in the front of the foot. Symptoms include pain, burning, and/or tingling sensations of the toes.

There are several steps a doctor will take to determine if one has Neuroma such as: radiographs, MRIs, and bone scans. Surgery is not required in many instances, and should only be considered when the patient is suffering from persistent pain.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is a condition that is less common than Interdigital Neuroma. It only seems to affect patients who have severe ankle pain which begins in the bottom of the foot extending all the way to the calf.  In other instances one may encounter partial numbness and atrophy if the cases are extreme.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Farmington Hills, Dearborn, Clarkston, and Trenton, MI. We offer all the latest in diagnostic and treatment technologies to meet your needs.

Read more about Nerve Disorders of the Foot and Ankle

 




Dr. Mayer Salama and Dr. Daniel Salama
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Trenton, MI 48183 -(734) 676-4664

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Dearborn, MI 48124 - (313) 274-0990

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