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Sever's Disease

Sever's disease, also known as calcaneal apophysitis, is a medical condition that causes heel pain in one or both feet of children during the period when their feet are growing. Sever's disease occurs most commonly in boys and girls between the ages of 8 and 14 years of age.

Sever's disease occurs when the part of the child's heel known as the growth plate, or the calcaneal epiphysis, an area attached to the Achilles tendon, suffers an injury or when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. The result is constant pain experienced at the back of the heel and the inability to put any weight on the heel, forcing the child to bear weight on their toes while walking. A toe gait develops in which the child must change the way they walk to avoid placing weight on the painful heel, a position that can lead to other developmental problems.

The most common symptom of Sever's disease is acute pain felt in the heel when a child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping or running. Children who are very active athletes are among the group most susceptible to experiencing Sever's disease because of the extreme stress and tension they place on their growing feet. Improper pronation, the rolling movement of the foot during walking or running, and obesity are all additional conditions linked to causing Sever's disease.

The first step in treating Sever's disease is to rest the foot and leg and avoid sports activity which only worsens the problem. Over the counter pain medications targeted at relieving inflammation can be helpful for reducing the amount of heel pain. Combined with rest and pain medication, a child with Sever's disease should wear shoes that properly support the heel and the arch of the foot. Consider purchasing orthotic shoe inserts which can help support the heel and foot while it is healing. Most patients with Sever's disease symptoms report an eventual elimination of heel pain after wearing orthotic insoles that support the affected heel.

Sever's disease may affect just one heel of either foot as well as the heels of both feet. It is important to have a child experiencing heel pain get an examination by a foot doctor who can apply the squeeze test, which compresses both sides of the heel in order to determine if there is intense pain. Discourage any child diagnosed with Sever's disease from going barefoot as this can intensify the problem. Apply ice packs to the affected painful heel two or three times a day for pain relief.

Exercises that help to stretch the calf muscles and hamstrings are effective at treating Sever's disease. An exercise known as foot curling, in which the foot is pointed away from the body, then curled toward the body in order to help stretch the muscles, has also proven to be very effective at treating Sever's disease. The curling exercise should be done in sets of 10 or 20 repetitions, and repeated several times throughout the day.

Treatment methods should usually continue for at least 2 weeks and as long as 2 months before the heel pain goes completely away and the child can resume normal physical and athletic activities again. A child can continue doing daily stretching exercises for the legs and feet to prevent the heel pain of Sever's disease from returning.

 

Solutions for Cracked Heels

Cracked heels can make life very frustrating when sandal season comes around, and can be very embarrassing. However, not only are they an aesthetic issue, they can also tear stockings, socks, and even wear out shoes faster. When severe, they may cause pain or infection.

Cracked heels are a problem for those who are athletic, who may walk a lot, and who have dry skin especially. Those who use medication that dry the skin, swim a lot, wear certain types of shoes, and who are diabetic may have trouble with cracked heels. Seniors whose skin produces less oil also may have trouble with cracked feet. There is no one way to develop cracked feet, and there is no cure.

Today, the market consists of numerous products that have a variety of ingredients to promote healing. Some of these are over-the-counter, and some are prescribed by a doctor; especially for those who have chronic dry feet and heels.

Some doctors may recommend wearing socks at night for those with rough skin. This helps further healing, and helps any creams put on the feet to stay on longer and better sink into the skin.

One way to alleviate dryness that causes cracked heels is by using moisturizers both day and night. Another way is to make sure the skin is clean and dry at all times. Using a pumice stone to remove dead skin before putting on moisturizer can also help, as cracked heels will not respond to the cream unless the outer layer of skin is first removed through exfoliation. After exfoliation, lotion or ointment will be absorbed by the skin more easily.

Foods that produce healing and balance can also help the skin from within. Everything that is put into the body can either help it or hurt it, and foods that give the body staying power will permeate through, especially through the first line of protection, the skin. Additionally in helping cracked heels, taking supplements of omega-3 fatty acids and zinc can be very beneficial.

Nevertheless, not all products that say they will help cracked feet will help. Seeing a professional is best if nothing else being tried works. A podiatrist should be able to give the best advice to help with this problem.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. Several common injuries can occur due to running. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing away and starts causing pain in the knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee can occur because of decreased strength in the quadricep muscles or shoes that do not offer proper support to the inside of the forefoot. Runner’s knee usually is treated with strengthening exercises focusing on the quad muscle and sports orthotic. To prevent runner’s knee, efforts should be focused on hip strengthening. Physical therapy is also beneficial in helping to learn the best exercises to heal runner’s knee. To prevent runner’s knee, strengthen the quad muscles to keep the kneecap aligned.

Overtraining is one cause of a common running injury called iliotibial band syndrome, which occurs when the iliotibial band gets irritated, causing pain and discomfort to the outside knee area. Another common running injury is known as plantar fasciitis, which occurs when the bone in the foot becomes inflamed and irritated. This injury primarily causes pain in the foot. Causes can include a high arch, incorrect footwear, tight muscles and flat feet. The best way to avoid plantar fasciitis is stretching and proper footwear.

Stress fractures are a common injury for runners. These fractures can occur because of overtraining, lack of calcium or running style. In runners, it is common for stress fractures to occur in several locations including the inner bone of the leg, the thighbone, the bone at the base of the spine and the toe bones in the foot. The best approach to preventing stress fractures are proper footwear maintenance and running on a surface with enough “give” to absorb some of the shock produced during running.

Besides overtraining, other causes of these common running injuries are poorly fitting footwear, irregular biomechanics, and lack of flexibility and strength. The best way to avoid running injuries is to prevent them. Fortunately, each of these common running injuries can be prevented. To avoid running injuries it is highly recommended to wear only footwear that fits properly and that suits your needs. Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury; therefore, choosing the correct footwear for running is important. It is important, too, to think about other aspects of your running routine like training schedules, flexibility and strengthening, and tailor them to your needs in order to minimize the possibility of injury. Regular stretching before and after running should be considered also when trying to avoid running injuries. Stretching keeps muscles limber resulting in greater flexibility.

 

Podiatric Rehab for Athletes

No sport that offers a complete guarantee from foot or ankle injuries exists. Even more simple activities such as participating in a game of darts or pool could risk injury to the foot in some way. Regardless of the sport or activity, any athlete suffering from a foot or ankle injury needs to find a way to get back on his or her feet as soon as possible. Although immediate results are desired, sometimes a quick recovery just isn’t possible.

All podiatric injuries require immediate attention. Anytime the foot or ankle sustains an injury, the muscles surrounding the bones may weaken or atrophy as a result of disuse. Although the bones heal on their own, it takes a particularly stronger effort on an athlete’s part to regain full use of the foot and ankle. A physician might recommend the patient undergo rehabilitation, or physical therapy. Physical therapy consists of simple but repetitive isometric exercises that will cause the body to rebuild the muscles and tendons in the area. Over time, a full range of movement is restored as a result of the therapy.

When it comes to choosing foot and ankle rehabilitation, a licensed sports therapist tends to be the best option. Licensed sports therapists are trained in dealing with athletic rehabilitation, and a good sports therapist knows how to take their time with a patient and help him or her understand their condition and the options available. General physical therapists also can do the job but may not understand the special demands an athlete has. Either way, so long as the therapist sees their client return to the field or court will make the exact recommendations required to get back in the game.

Although professional athletes most definitely need a trained sports therapist, amateur and weekend athletes can also benefit from sports therapy as well. No foot or ankle injury should cause someone to give up a sport or hobby he or she loves, and a sports therapist can provide a tremendous help in that regard.

Physical therapy does not always heal certain injuries one hundred percent but will help the affected patient get progressively better. Lesser injuries only last a while with a sports therapist. Foot and ankle rehabilitation services should be on a priority for any athlete with a foot or ankle injury.
 

Dr. Mayer Salama and Dr. Daniel Salama
3408 West Rd (In Grange Plaza)
Trenton, MI 48183 -(734) 676-4664

2200 Monroe
Dearborn, MI 48124 - (313) 274-0990

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Farmington Hills, MI  48336 - (248) 474-0040